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English                                                      

8/12/17

The Heart of Darkness and the Secret
Sharer Annotated Bibliography

Zeitler,
Michael. “Isolation in Heart of Darkness.” Encyclopedia of Themes in
Literature, 3-

Volume
Set, Facts on File, 2010. Bloom’s Literature, online.infobase.com/HRC/Search/Details/38721?q=heart
of darkness. Accessed 30 Nov. 2017.

            Early in the narration of the
heart of the darkness, it starts as Marlow the fellow sailor traveler that has
an adventuress mindset but he is a very quiet and in his own mind. Marlow from
the beginning he shows himself as an isolated figure and an outsider who is
apart from the other seamen and even within the Nellie of the river he is a
very sensitive observer and seems too distinct himself from among the other
people. He feels as an imposter along his passage through Africa within these
other travelers because it’s not like the travelers as him. As Marlow makes his
way through the Congo he deepens himself and finds himself in a situation where
he is in a setting of outrage, greed, laziness and utter difference to a human
suffrage that is being displayed within his European co-workers. Upon his
arrival, he has zero to no contact with the native Africans.  Marlow attempts to create his identity
individually, through technological expertise with his progress upriver toward
Kurtz but later leaves his European civilization behind and goes into a heart
of darkness His descent into savagery suggests to Marlow how thin the veneer of
culture might be and the temptations to which he, himself, is subject to his
isolation.

 Marlow from the start
strikes us as a very lonesome figure. Although he is a part of the small group
of people that on sitting on the steamer called the “Nellie”. He
himself, however, shows a very different mindset from the other individuals. He
has the temperament of a man who wishes to be away from others, but he enjoys
observing them and meditating on what he saw. There was a puzzling distance
that presented itself between Marlow and his aunt who gave him his job. She is
cordial and wholehearted, but Marlow, on the other hand, is reserved and
cold.  Her belief is that the white men
go to the regions to benefit upon the savages, but in his opinion, it’s the
opposite, where the white men’s view is entirely wrong. His sense of isolation
increases when he sees several areas in the Congo. The areas display the
failures of the white men’s control and the suffering of the so-called
“savages”. He realizes that the cruelty present in the white man creates a
barrier between him and the white men living in the Congo.

ACHEBE,
CHINUA. “An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad’s Heart of Darkness.”

Massachusetts
Review, vol. 57, no. 1, Spring2016, pp. 14-27. EBSCOhost,
scsl.idm.oclc.org/login?auth=discus=http://search.ebscohost.com.scsl.idm.oclc.org/login.aspx?direct=true=lfh=114187095=eds-live=site.

            Achebe discusses in the fall
of 1974 a woman met a man and a professor that taught an English class. This
awaked unknowingly man had a huge enthusiasm about the fact on how very young
this woman was and if she was a student at the University of Massachusetts. The
women replied with a no and with a response of she was a teacher and how she
taught African literature. When the women told him that she taught this
literature he was amazed by how someone else as him taught the same thing.
After this encounter this man conveys to the women he would like to take her
course maybe one day and she later receives letters from a few students from
Yonkers New York asking about how they need to take her class and also a trip
to Africa to encounter and live these events as the ones she teaches about in
her class. When this statement comes off a youthful inexperience and lack of
knowledge she embarks in the response of a book heart of darkness by John
Conrad witch the course would help these students understand the situation a
lot better than just assume the situation. The book of the heart of darkness
would be a great novel for these students to understand as Joseph Conrad a
great stylist of modern fiction and great storytelling shows his contribution
to African literature. The narrator later describes the novel by using a
passage of the book piece by piece from each selection of the chapters to show
that Joseph Conrad shows points of racism. Joseph Conrad projects the book
“the heart of darkness as an image that Africa as a world where many
people don’t live in. this statement shows clear evidence that Joseph views the
whole country of Africa as a place of isolation of one race only. As the
narrator continues to paragraphs from the books f Heart of Darkness will often
tell you that Conrad is concerned not so much with Africa as with the
deterioration of one European mind caused by solitude and sickness Africa as
setting and backdrop which eliminates the African as human factor. The narrator
continues to utilize the passages in the novel to describe the racism she
quotes that Conrad had a huge problem with niggers and he saw Europe as a
greater country and untouchable. He viewed as Europe an advance to civilization
and superior to any country especially of the niggers of Africa. at the end of
the summary, the narrator describes Joseph Conrad that the Africans are nobody
to deserve the language of dialects and the language is too grand for these
“chaps” or niggers Conrad saw and condemned the evil of imperial
exploitation and its racial themes present throughout the novel.

            This source examined by
Achebe correlates to the novel because it represents the racism that is present
throughout the text. As referenced by Achebe she herself encountered it in 1974
while many of the so-called “savages” similarly did as well in 1899.
Although it had already been a little over seven decades it was clear that not
much had changed about the white man’s perspective of looking down upon other
ethnicities. When Kurt embarked upon his journey to search for ivory his
greediness and imperialism ideals was the same mindset of any racist white man
that embarked to conquer any piece of land. He regarded very little for the
people and felt that the white race was superior to any other race.  He scrutinized and contemplated if they even
were in the same world since the “savages” were deemed uncivilized in
his perspective. In the source, Achebe quotes that Conrad states “Language
is too grand for these chaps; let’s give them dialects!” thereby
reintegrating the constant racism that is present in the novel. Kurt is looked
upon as a rich and powerful by Marlow who also is racist but realizes the
racism that is present in Kurt that ends up consuming him. The racism in Marlow
is present, but he is more of a bystander and although he does nothing to help
the savages he feels apologetic for them. Marlow aspires to be like Kurt, but
he also notes that the racism consumed him because he was too greedy and in a
way, became a savage himself. 

Dorau,
Bethany Groff. “Analysis: “The White Man’s Burden” (1899).”
“Defining Documents

Online
Edition”. Defining Documents Online Edition, Mar. 2017, pp. 1-2.
EBSCOhost,
scsl.idm.oclc.org/login?auth=discus=http://search.ebscohost.com.scsl.idm.oclc.org/login.aspx?direct=true=khh=123687706=eds-live=site.

            The poem of White man’s burden by Kipling’s is seen
a way they sent young men to do the hard task of civilizing an “a new
caught sullen people” in these imperial territories. Within this poem, the
author warns the reader to not feel any type of remorse or effect over these
slaves/colored humans and he calls them a “half-devil and half-child”
within the Kipling’s poem. This poem tries to express the hatred and dialkenes
of anyone that isn’t like the white man. These young men come into to civilize
these new lands that haven’t been explored and they tend to take over and
expand the European rule of freedom. Though this poem is clearly celebrating
the difficult work of imperialism, it has a strong cautionary message. This
poem was also ridiculed for its condescending, moralistic tone, with opponents
of imperial expansion arguing that greed and commerce were the primary
motivation for such exploration

            Imperialism is one of the
foremost noticeable themes in this novel. By the 1890s, many areas had been
overtaken by the darkness of the European power. The rule was stretched thin
and the attempt to administer and protect the empires started to crumble. Many
cracks started to emerge and in this novel, it depicts how things were falling
apart. This novel implies that when white men are given the opportunity to rule
outside of a system of checks and balances: especially power over human beings,
corruption is enviable. Although this begs to differ the issue of whether you
may call an individual insane when he is a part of a system that is so
thoroughly corrupted that no white man can perceive. This novel is at a
national level, an account about the struggle of comprehending a world that is
beyond yourself and the competence of an individual being able to arbitrate another.

Witkoski,
Michael. “Heart of Darkness.” Magill’s Survey of World Literature,
Revised Edition,

January
2009, pp. 1-2. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true=lfh=103331MSW16279850000626=cpid.

            In Heart of Darkness, Conrad introduces his
narrative view in a precisely removed manner. The story starts with Marlow and
four companions on board a little boat on the Thames River, discussing their
encounters. One of the listeners, who is never named within the story, is the
real storyteller of the story he has heard from Marlow. Within Inside this
narrative structure, the story carries forward and backward as Marlow relates
some portion of his story, at that point remarks upon it. Now and again, Marlow
makes extra reflections upon his own particular observations. It is just by
retelling the occasions that Marlow comes to comprehend them, a steady
disclosure that is shared within the reader itself. Heart of Darkness makes
significant utilization of symbolism as Conrad’s use of symbolism the literary
device that uses the pictures of a work to emphasize and underline its subjects
and implications in a significant number of his works, particularly in this
scene, which becomes denser and darker as Marlow’s trip advances. The system is
fundamental for Heart of Darkness; the hidden implications of the story are
excessively alarming and dreary, making it impossible to be communicated
straightforwardly. Conrad additionally utilizes symbolism all through his story
to underscore the significance of occasions as Marlow comes to comprehend them.
Alternate extremes are visiting, so splendor has diverged from misery; the
lavish development of the wilderness is compared with the sterility of the
white merchants; and the rich, notwithstanding disturbing, the existence of the
wild is constantly associated with death and decay. Running all through the
story are pictures and similitudes of franticness, particularly the craziness
caused by confinement. Specifically, the decay of Kurtz is a capable
representative articulation of the shortcomings of apparently humanized
Europeans. The prevailing image for the whole work is found in its title and
last words

            Marlow’s narrative is primarily based on a very
mysterious dark way to show Africa as a dangers treacherous jungle, filled with
savagery and cannibalism within the natives that live on the continent of
Africa. Qualities of Marlow’s start to develop most rapidly in the figure of
Kurtz a man calmed of all social and socialized restrictions, who goes frantic
subsequent to conferring himself to the cumulative quest for malice and
degeneracy. The heart of darkness contains a substantial amount symbolism
within the story of Marlow and his journey to Nellie. Joseph Conrad uses the
Congo River as the representation of symbolism emphasize of its themes and
meanings in the description of Marlow’s journey as it grows darker and darker.
The river Marlow and his other companions follow is a representation of the
movement toward a goal to the finish line. The river symbolizes the more they
become closer and closer within the river they will have the opportunity to get
the most of the ivory they need and for Marlow, it symbolizes the closer it is
for him to meet Kurtz. 

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